RSS Chief Mohan Bhagwat calls for nation-building post-election

“Election is a process of building consensus. Parliament has two sides so that both aspects of any question can be considered… Every issue has two sides. If one side is addressed by one party, the Opposition party should address the other dimension, so that we reach the right decision,” Bhagwat stated, highlighting the importance of a balanced parliamentary process.

| Updated: 11 June, 2024 4:41 pm IST
Mohan Bhagwat emphasised the need to shift focus from election rhetoric to nation-building.

NAGPUR: In his first public address following the recent Lok Sabha elections, Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) chief Mohan Bhagwat emphasised the need to shift focus from election rhetoric to nation-building.

Speaking at an RSS event in Nagpur, Bhagwat offered critical reflections on the election campaign and urged both the new government and the Opposition to adopt a more constructive approach.

“Election is a process of building consensus. Parliament has two sides so that both aspects of any question can be considered… Every issue has two sides. If one side is addressed by one party, the Opposition party should address the other dimension, so that we reach the right decision,” Bhagwat stated, highlighting the importance of a balanced parliamentary process.

ALSO READ: RSS chief Mohan Bhagwat urges focus on Manipur conflict, post-election nation-building

The recent Lok Sabha elections saw the Congress increase its seats from 52 to 99, while the BJP’s tally fell to 240, below the majority mark of 272.

The Opposition now holds 234 seats in the Lok Sabha. Despite these shifts, Bhagwat dismissed the need for in-depth analysis of the election results by the Sangh. “The Sangh works for refining public opinion in every election, did it this time also but does not get entangled in the analysis of the outcome… Why do people get elected? To go to parliament, evolve a consensus on various issues,” he remarked.

 

 

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Addressing the post-election environment, Bhagwat criticised the negativity and divisive tactics employed during the campaign. “The way things have happened, the way both sides have attacked below the belt, the way completely ignored the impact of campaign strategies that would lead to divisions, increasing social and mental fault lines, and unnecessarily drew the organisations like RSS in the same. Using technology, falsehood was spread, absolute falsehood,” he said.

Bhagwat also addressed the pressing issue of violence in Manipur, which has been ongoing since ethnic clashes erupted in May last year. The conflict between the Imphal valley-based Meiteis and hill-based Kukis has resulted in over 200 deaths and displaced thousands. Recent incidents in Jiribam, including an attack on Chief Minister N Biren Singh’s convoy, have further heightened tensions.

 

ALSO READ: RSS chief Mohan Bhagwat stresses humility and consensus in post-election address

“It’s been a year since Manipur has been waiting for peace. The state remained peaceful for the last 10 years, but suddenly, gun culture has increased again. It is important to resolve the conflict as a priority,” Bhagwat emphasised, urging immediate attention to the crisis in Manipur.

Concluding his address, Bhagwat reiterated the need for moving beyond electoral excitement and focusing on national challenges. “Elections are a process of building consensus. There is a system in place to ensure that both sides of any issue are represented in a like-minded Parliament. Naturally, achieving such a consensus is challenging among individuals who have arrived there through intense competition. However, it is a competition, not war,” he said.

 

 

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